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Overcoats and Other Cold-Weather Clothing
British Pattern Other Ranks Greatcoat

When the British Other Ranks five-button Service Dress (SD) jacket was introduced in 1902, a matching greatcoat was also issued. Like the British SD jacket, it was manufactured from khaki wool with five large (23 mm) buttons to secure the front opening. The stand and fall collar was very large and designed to protect the wearer from cold with the collar turned up. It was secured by one hook.

Shoulder straps were sewn permanently into the shoulder seams and secured by small buttons near the collar which was flancked by rifle patches. There were two lower front pockets cut straight and fitted with straight flaps secured with 18 mm buttons to allow access into the interior pockets. The coat was partially lined including the sleeves. Like the SD jacket, rank was indicated through a series of stripes and/or crowns worn on both sleeves.
Canadian Seven-button Other Ranks Greatcoat

When the Canadian seven-button SD jacket was introduced in 1903, a matching greatcoat was also issued. It differed from the British pattern in that the front opening was secured by 7 small buttons, there were no rifle pacthes, and there were no shoulder straps. The back of the Other Ranks issued Canadian greatcoat had a large box pleat with a rear belt with two buttons for adjustment.

There are three other patterns of overcoat that occasionally appears in photographs which might be uniquely Canadian. Unfortunately, I do not have photographs. The first has the unique feature of a small pocket with a button on the back side of the left sleeve near the cuff. The second appears to be a standard Canadian manufactured greatcoat, but the buttons are hidden on the front. The last, may have only been issued to troops going to Siberia. It was double-breasted with a massive fold-down collar with a large built-in cloth belt.
Canadian Manufactured Five-button Greatcoat

Canadian manufactured five-button greatcoats differed from the British pattern in that they (usually) were made without shoulder straps. This example of a Canadian manufactured Other Ranks issued Canadian greatcoat was manufactured in Montreal and worn by Sapper R.W. Pearson Canadian Engineers 1st Division. The coat is ankle length rough khaki wool and secured with five brass Canada buttons.
The interior is partially lined in a white wool blanket material, except the sleeves which are lined in a white cotton. There are faded remnants of a "WD" stamp on the left (right in the photo) lapel.
The back of the Other Ranks issued Canadian greatcoat showing the box pleats and rear belt with two buttons.
Other Ranks Mounted Pattern Greatcoat

The Other Ranks mounted pattern greatcoat was originally designed for mounted troops but was issued to all arms by war's end. The coat was from khaki wool and double breasted for warmth, but was only knee length. The reduced length also removed the necessity for troops to lift the bottom of the greatcoat with hooks to prevent it from getting excessively muddy or wet. The front was secured by 4 large British General-Service brass buttons on each side. Under the collar, there is a flap to enable the wearer to close the collar in the up-position during inclement weather.

The Other Ranks mounted pattern greatcoat is in many respects, very similar to the officer's privately purchased "Trench Warm" and was almost certainly influenced by the officer's overcoat.
Unlike the Other Ranks dismounted Troops greatcoat, there was no rear box pleat or rear belt with buttons.
A Canadian soldier in the Artillery wearing the mounted pattern greatcoat.
The entire interior is lined in a white wool blanket material, except the sleeves which are lined in a white cotton. There are faded remnants of a "WD" stamp on the left (right in the photo) lapel.
Officers "Trench Warm"

The officers overcoat was commonly referred to as a "Trench Warm", or as just a "Warm". The British Trench Warm was made from wool and double breasted for warmth, but was only knee length. The color was typically much lighter than the issued OR's greatcoat. This 1916 dated example of a Trench Warm is knee-length and double breasted with brass Captain's pips on the shoulder straps. The front is secured with leather covered wooden buttons.
The interior is lined in a bronze-colored cloth, except the sleeves which are lined in white silk.
A pair of Canadian officers ham-it-up for the photographer. The officer on the right is wearing the officer's "trench warm". On the back of the card, it reads: "Dear Chas, Doesn't this picture look like two drunkards? Bob. 9 Sept 16"
Jerkin

A leather jerkin was issued to some troops during the Great War. It was a sleeveless leather vest lined secured at the front opening by four large buttons and lined in a light drab wool similar to the SD jacket. Typically, issued great War leather Jerkins utilized leather-covered wooden buttons secured to the jerkin by a loop on the back of the button and held in place with a split-ring. The buttons on this example have been hand-sewn.
This example was worn by Driver Ethert Clair Lutes 65th Battery Canadian Field Artillery R.C.H.A. Ethert Clair Lutes joined the CEF in Moncton New Brunswick in April 1916, served in France and was discharged as wounded in Dec 1918.
Driving Leathers

A rather scare photo of an uncommon set of protective clothing. This lorry driver is wearing what appears to be leather double-breasted jacket and breeches. Based upon the refection on the band of his cap, it appears the cap might be also made from leather.
Balaclava

The cold weather issue Balaclava is a piece of clothing that is still issued today with very little change. This example is not dated, but came with the CEF grouping of Sapper R.W. Pearson Canadian Engineers 1st Division. The faint "C" broad-arrow stamp is visible on the bottom of the neck flap.
Mitts

The cold weather issue Mitts are still issued today, also with very little change. This set are not dated, but came with the CEF grouping of Sapper R.W. Pearson Canadian Engineers 1st Division.
 
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